Eyes on the prize: Commission on the Status of Women's 2015 agreement must have a gender goal | ActionAid UK

Kasia Staszewska

Women’s Rights Policy Adviser

The Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) convenes every March in the UN headquarters in New York and is a special date in every feminist and women’s rights calendar.

Kasia outside the UN in New York for the Commission on the Status of Women.
Kasia outside the UN in New York for the Commission on the Status of Women.

Being the principal global policy-making body dedicated exclusively to gender equality and women’s rights, for two weeks the Commission on the Status of Women brings together representatives of the Member States, UN agencies, women’s rights and civil society organisations.

This year more than 6000 of us are in town for the annual evaluation of progress, standards setting and policy formulation to promote women’s advancement worldwide.

New development agenda: stakes are high

This year stakes are exceptionally high due to the upcoming review of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which will finish just one year from now. Not surprisingly, the new development framework post 2015 is the major item on the agenda: it will define the development priorities for the next decade. 

Although the official focus of the meeting that started this Monday 10th March, is to review the progress the MDGs have brought for women and girls, everyone’s eyes are already on the new framework that will replace them.

This is for a very good reason: the anticipated Commission’s agreed conclusions will be the key contribution putting forward women’s and girls’ priorities for the new ‘development era’ post 2015.

The MDGs didn’t address issues of critical importance for women and girls – gender based violence, or women’s disproportionate responsibility for unpaid care work, to name but a few — nor were they consulted or agreed together with women’s organisations.

Because of this, it is imperative that the process leading to the new development agenda is not business as usual, but lays the solid groundwork for women’s and girls’ full enjoyment of all their human rights.

Making gains on the battleground

Although everyone seems to agree that the overall progress in the implementation of the MDGs has been unacceptably slow, there is still no agreement about the ways to deliver real change for women and girls In its High Level Statement: ‘Accelerating Progress on the MDGs for Women and Girls and Realising Women’s and Girls’ Rights in the Post-2015 Development Agenda’, Heads of UN Agencies called upon all governments to honor their obligations and build the new development framework in line with existing human rights norms and agreements.

The resonance of their appeal, however, remains to be seen, as negotiations on the CSW outcome document will resume today and will continue until at least the official end of the event, Friday 21st March.

With the CSW being the regular battleground between progressive and more conservative forces, ‘winning’ an official CSW recommendation to create a stand-alone goal on gender equality, women’s rights and women’s empowerment for the new agenda post 2015 will be a key outcome sought by women’s rights advocates, including ActionAid, in the forthcoming week.

ActionAid subscribes to the Feminist Declaration Post

Mindful that the struggle for women’s rights is global, ActionAid representatives from UK, Uganda, Kenya, Australia, Sierra Leone, India and other countries have joined forces with women’s, feminist and civil society organisations from all regions of the world in a common effort for strong CSW conclusions.

We are one of more than 340 organisations subscribed to the Feminist Declaration Post 2015, ‘Gender, Economic, Social and Ecological Justice for Sustainable Development’, calling for the new development agenda to be based on universality of human rights, substantive equality, end the shocking inequality of wealth, power and resources, and ensure that poor women are put at its centre.

Find out more about our women’s rights work

Kasia Staszewska/ActionAid