Support ActionAid’s Arise Fund

Where does the money go?

The climate crisis is a major focus of the Arise Fund.

As the changing climate leads to increases in severe storms, flooding, droughts and other hazards, it is the poorest countries that are worst hit, and it is the women and girls in those countries who are disproportionately affected.

As well as bringing urgently needed medical response in the immediate aftermath of a crisis, the Arise Fund helps train local women as community leaders and set up safe spaces for women to meet, receive information, learn more about specific risks they face like gender-based violence, and access referral services.

How your donation makes a difference

Over the next 10 years, our ambition is to raise £5 million to reach two million people around the world through women’s leadership. We can only meet this goal with the help of generous supporters who share our commitment to gender equality and lasting change.  

ActionAid has a strong track record of emergency response, and we know that our approach works. Since 1974 we have responded to emergencies – from natural disasters and disease outbreaks to conflicts and refugee crises – in 47 countries. 

And we know that when women rise – when women lead – a better future becomes possible.

How your contribution will help women rise

We can’t achieve the ambitious goals of the Arise Fund alone – we need people who share our vision to join us.

Donation value

£5000

could provide 1,000 families with hygiene essentials during an emergency to help women and girls manage their periods and prevent the spread of waterborne diseases.

£15000

could set up seven women-friendly centres where women can access emergency supplies and receive counselling and support after an emergency.

£20000

could provide training for 1,640 people on how to stay safe in an emergency, including setting up drills and evacuation practices, reducing the impact of future disasters.

Or choose your own amount to give

£

Joyce, 43, is a women's forum leader in Vanuatu

Solaye Snider/ActionAid

How women leaders make the difference

Joyce is the leader of a women's forum in Vanuatu, which evolved from ActionAid’s humanitarian response to Cyclone Pam in 2015. 

When the cyclone hit, it left widespread devastation in her community, but women in some villages were excluded from the emergency response.

"Sometimes they reject all the women thinking all the women are not enough to do the work," she said.

Joyce joined the Women I Tok Tok Tugeta women's forum which, supported by ActionAid, enabled women to identify their own needs, lead action plans to addresses those issues, and build solidarity and power with one another.

"If women group together and talk… then all the leaders of the community, specifically all the men, can trust the ladies," she said. "Then they can agree we can have rights to work together with all the men."

Since Joyce became President, she has led the forum in their disaster prepardness work, and in responding to the impact of climate change.

She hopes "that women leaders will emerge from this group to be a role model to the future generation."

Get in touch about the Arise Fund

If you have any questions, need more information or want to discuss making a contribution to the Arise Fund, please fill in your details below, and we'll be in touch. 

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How we use the money you give us

For every £1 we spend:

69p is spent on programme activity, including humanitarian and development work

17p is spent on fundraising

11p is spent on support costs (running the organisation)

3p is spent on campaigning for change

These figures are taken from our expenditure in 2018. We’re committed to keeping our supporters happy and being open and honest about how we fundraise. To find out more you can read our supporter promise.

Find out more about who we are and how we’re funded

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Top image: Members of the Chinnaparrakudi’s women’s collective in Kerela, who have rebuilt their community after devastating floods in 2018. Credit: ActionAid. Others: Sheldon Moultrie/ActionAid; Gayatri Ganju/ActionAid; Natalia Jidovanu/ActionAid

Page updated 22 September 2021