Blog

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Why everyone's talking about periods

Michelle Lowery – Communications Team

‘The blob’, ‘Aunty Flow’ - whatever you call periods, this week they've been all over the news, and it's about to be all over your Facebook timeline too. At last, we're talking about the fact that half (or thereabouts) of the population of the world bleed out of their private parts once a month. About time too.

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This Mother's Day the biggest choice I’ll be making will be whether to take mum out for afternoon tea or cook her dinner. But for refugee mothers, caring for their families this week will mean making choices with life or death consequences.

Tags: refugees, lesvos

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Refugee children: a mental illness time bomb?

Oliver James – Psychologist, author and guest blogger

"Childhood maltreatment is the main cause of mental illness; it is not in our genes," says acclaimed author and psychologist Oliver James. In this guest blog ahead of his new book of the same name, ‘Not in Your Genes’, Oliver explores the emotional and psychological impacts of Europe's refugee crisis on children, and warns of the huge public health crisis that is looming as a result.

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Using our analysis of more than 500 tax treaties, ActionAid's new report, 'Mistreated', shows how these agreements negatively affect a developing country's ability to tax the profits from foreign owned companies who operate within their borders. Along with Italy, the UK has 13 of them! Here we take a look at what the research shows, as well as what this means for countries that are bound by them.

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Meet three amazing campaigners from ActionAid’s youth network, Activista, who are working on our Make Tax Fair campaign in Malawi. They’re pretty angry about the UK-Malawi tax treaty, which makes it possible for UK companies to get away with paying little or no tax in their country, and are fighting hard to get it changed.

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As I was eating lunch with my three-year-old over the weekend, I heard a radio interview with Jamal, who had lost 13 members of his family as they fled the conflict in Syria. They had drowned trying to reach the safety of Europe. My son, oblivious to the tragedy unfolding on air, chatted happily to me as he ate his sandwiches, excited about visiting his granny in the afternoon. As a child growing up in the UK with friends and family within walking distance of his home, his life is full of certainty and security.