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"I can still hear the sound of the cutting"

Zeinab Hassan – Women's rights, ActionAid Somaliland

I was mutilated when I was six years old. It was the most painful thing I can imagine and has caused me on-going problems ever since. I don’t have a daughter of my own to protect, but I don’t want anyone’s daughter to ever have to have FGM and suffer the way I have, and countless generations of women before me. This is my story.

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Malawi is the poorest country in the world. And thanks to an unfair tax agreement, signed with the UK over half a century ago, British companies who work there can get away with paying hardly any tax in the country. That means essential public services like schools and hospitals are starved of funds, so that Malawi’s poorest women and girls pay the price for this tax dodging.

It’s time for that to change.

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Why tax is a feminist issue

Natasha Adams – Tax Campaign Manager

Taxes are the key building blocks of societies. They pay for the vast array of public services that societies rely on, and that people living in poverty so badly need. But when tax dodging starves public services of funding, it’s women and girls who pay the highest price. Why? Let's take a look.​

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"My name is Siba. I am 19 years old and I want to be a doctor. I fled from southern Syria after life became too dangerous for us. The turning point came when a bomb went off and my father was injured in the face and hands. 

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Standing on the sandy shores of a Greek island just as the sun is colouring the horizon pink, you’d almost be forgiven for thinking you’re in paradise. Until you see the boat coming in.

Then the extent of the tragedy that is the refugee crisis really begins to sink in.

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A new ActionAid report reveals that the Nigerian people lost out on a whopping US$3.3 billion after some of the world’s biggest oil and gas companies were given a ‘holiday’ from paying tax. Here’s what this means for the people of Nigeria, and why women and girls are the hardest hit.