Tax justice campaigning from Zambia to Denmark | ActionAid UK

I had the amazing opportunity to visit ActionAid Zambia with a group of young activists from ActionAid Denmark a couple of weeks ago. Now our tax justice campaign has truly gone global, it’s great to see how different countries are learning from each other and working together to tackle tax dodging.
 

Zambia is a beautiful country, and the communities we visited were friendly and welcoming, but it was sobering to see the poverty of young farmers struggling to see hope for a better future however hard they worked.

We visited the copperbelt, and met activists and citizens from the communities that live next door to several large mines. Everywhere we went the story was the same — people complained about about the mines not paying their fair share and about pollution. Although the mines we visited had done some good work in communities, like building roads and refurbishing schools, the general consensus was that they weren’t doing nearly enough.

ActionAid Zambia partner organisation CTPD (Centre for Trade Policy and Development) works to challenge mining companies like Glencore, accused of dodging taxes in the country. When we visited the CTPD office, Programme Officer Nkula Edward Goma said “Over the last 10 years Zambia lost about $8.8bn through tax evasion and illicit financial flows: that is a lot of money that could alleviate poverty. Right now we have about 60% of people living below the poverty line, earning less than $2 a day. What belongs to Zambia should remain in Zambia …then maybe our people would be much better off.”

ActionAid Zambia launched their public campaign on tax justice last year with a march in Lusaka, joining the international call for Barclays to stop promoting tax havens in Africa. As we found out on the trip, campaigning in Zambia is not easy. My Zambian colleagues struggled for weeks to get the permit they needed for the march to happen, without which they could have faced jail for going ahead. This march was great example of global campaign collaboration, using facts from the UKTime to Clean Up’ report, and gold jumpsuits similar to those used in the Danish tax power campaign (these suits came together for the first time in the picture above).

It was really inspiring to meet many young Zambian campaigners (part of the international Activista network), determined to campaign even when things are difficult. Charity Chizola, who studies law at the University of Zambia, had this message for tax justice campaigners from the UK and Denmark:  “They should keep fighting. Sometimes we do have a number of challenges and feel we shouldn’t go on, but what we are fighting for is greater, and is for the benefit of every citizen, every youth, every child, every elderly person that is out there.”

The trip ended with a day devoted to sharing our tax campaigning achievements from the UK, Denmark and Zambia, and we discussed how to strengthen links between ActionAid campaigners fighting for tax justice around the world. Danish students, also part of the Activista network, were getting ready for their tax justice themed Tour De Future cycle protest which travels across Denmark in the spring. Marie Uldall Thomsen, a Danish student, said “I didn’t feel part of a global Network… But now after having been in Zambia, I have so many connections. It has a bigger effect to be able to say that this is a global campaign and everything that we do is being done in Zambia, UK, Uganda and so on.”

I’ve been inspired to work even harder to keep the pressure on Barclays since returning home –if Barclays stops promoting tax havens in Africa, this could be an important step forwards for countries like Zambia to collect the taxes they are due. We’re asking campaigners who want to do more to get their MP involved and to join the Community Campaigner network.