Tsunami in Indonesia 2018 | ActionAid UK

Tsunami in Indonesia 2018

The aerial view of affected by the earthquake and liquefaction at Balaroa. The Balaroa area is a densely populated residential area.

The aerial view of affected by the earthquake and liquefaction at Balaroa. The Balaroa area is a densely populated residential are.

Photo: ActionAid

What was ActionAid’s response to the Indonesian tsunami?

Immediate response

In the first two weeks, YAPPIKA-ActionAid (YAA) worked with a network of local organisations called ‘Sulteng Bergerak’ to bring relief to at least 60,000 people.  Local volunteers provided supplies, ran emergency kitchens serving hot food to displaced people and participated in search and resuce missions. 

  • In the first two weeks since the disaster, ActionAid and its partners launched a team of more than 60 staff and volunteers in Palu, Donggala, and Sigi — working round the clock, delivering aid to thousands of affected people.
  • Our emergency appeal raised nearly £1.2m.
  • We opened public kitchens in twelve of the worst hit areas where thousands remain without food or proper shelter. Our public kitchens on the West Coast, Donggala, Sigi and the city of Palu are have served thousands of people a day with hot, nutritious meals.
  • 1,785 families were provided with food through the community kitchen and food kits.
  • We reached at least 60,000 people with emergency aid, including tents, tarpaulins and blankets to shelter families who lost their homes, and food, water, clothing and nappies.
  • 400 sanitary kits were distributed to women and girls to manage their periods safely.
  • Three women-friendly spaces were set up reaching at least 600 women directly.

 

Long-term response

We then launched a six-month response with our partners on the ground, focusing on food, water, shelter, psycho-social support and the protection of women and girls living in temporary camps. We’re supporting families by rebuilding homes for the most vulnerable, supporting sustainable livelihoods such as farming and recovery of women’s economic activity such as trading or food processing so families can once again earn a living. 

 

Footnotes

Page updated 19 September 2019