violence against women and girls | ActionAid UK

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Violence against women and girls

Rani works in the Gauravi Crisis Centre in Bhopal, India, giving support to survivors of violence

Trigger warning: description of domestic violence which some may find distressing.ActionAid Senior Technical Advisor for Violence Against Women and Girls, Danielle Cornish-Spencer, writes about her own experience of domestic violence, and three of the reasons why survivors of violence don't 'just leave'. 

Scales of justice: the Kavanaugh case shows that survivors’ voices are often marginalised by justice systems

A year ago, women all over the world started sharing their stories of abuse and harassment through #metoo.  A year on, the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the US Supreme Court serves as a powerful reminder of how much is still at stake.

Women from Aboroshya women's group in Rwanda celebrate their training in women's rights. Photo: Jane Lennon/ActionAid

#BringTheNoise protest has my vote

Posted in Blogs 5 months 5 days ago

As Donald Trump meets with Theresa May and the Queen today, ActionAid USA Director Marie Clarke explains why it’s so important we take a stand for women’s rights.

Women marching as part of ActionAid Somaliland's Safe Cities Campaign on May 20, 2015

On 13th July, ActionAid will be joining the Bring The Noise protest in London to highlight the importance of women’s rights. Here, our Somaliland Country Director explains why she’ll be amongst those leading the march.

Lavender lives in Nyarongi, Kenya, where many girls are affected by period poverty.

Period poverty is a problem. One in 10 girls in Africa miss school during their period because they don’t have access to sanitary products, or because there aren’t safe, private toilets for them to use at school.1 In a class of thirty girls, that means three students are falling behind with their studies every month. Simply because they’re girls. When girls can't afford to buy sanitary products, it can stop them from achieving their full potential. Find out how period poverty is affecting girls in Nyarongi, Kenya, and how you can help make sure that periods don't hold girls back.

Thomas is the station manager at Ruben FM. Along with his team, Thomas is raising awareness about sexual and gender-based violence in Mukuru slum, Kenya.

Tackling violence against women and girls isn’t just about supporting survivors. It’s about changing attitudes and challenging the inequalities at the heart of gender-based violence. Thomas Ochieng is doing just that. He’s the station manager at Ruben FM, a community radio station in Mukuru - a large slum to the east of Nairobi. Alongside ActionAid partner, the Wangu Kanja Foundation, Thomas and his team are raising awareness about gender-based violence. They're using the airwaves to challenge sexual violence and get ActionAid's message out into the community.